A blog of the Philadelphia Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section

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Session Schedule

Senate

April 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

House

April 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, & 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, & 30

Bills Moving

House

Investigational Drugs: House Bill 45 (Godshall-R-Montgomery) providing for the use of investigational drugs, biological products and devices by terminally ill patients “Right To Try” legislation was reported out of the House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

At Risk Children: House Bill 217 (Kauffman-R-Franklin) further providing for the differentiating cases of placing a child at risk (sponsor summary) was amended on the House Floor and was refereed to the House Appropriations Committee.

Theft Of Metals: House Bill 267 (Metcalfe-R- Butler) relating to the theft of secondary metals (sponsor summary) was referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Epilepsy Drug Exemption From Prescription Monitoring: House Bill 395 (DiGirolamo-R- Bucks) providing for an exemption from prescription monitoring for epilepsy drug (sponsor summary) was removed from the Table and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Preempting Local Firearms Ordinances: House Bill 671 (M.Keller-R- Cumberland) state preemption over local firearms and ammunition regulations (sponsor summary) was reported from the House Judiciary Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Unwanted Phone Calls: House Bill 448 (Topper-R-Bedford) further providing for unwanted telephone solicitation calls related to elder abuse (sponsor summary) was reported out of the House Consumer Affairs Committee with a request that it be referred to the House Aging and Older Adults Committee and it was.

Do Not Call List: House Bill 105 (Cox-R-Berks) further providing for changes to the do not call list (sponsor summary) was reported out of the House Consumer Affairs Committee and Tabled.

Indecent Exposure: House Bill 489 (Quigley-R-Montgomery) further providing penalties for indecent exposure (sponsor summary) was referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Stolen Valor: House Bill 168 (Saccone-R- Allegheny) Stolen Valor Act (sponsor summary) was amended and reported from the House Judiciary Committee and Tabled.

Senate

Movers Penalties: Senate Bill 458 (Argall-R-Schuylkill) strengthening penalties for illegal household goods movers operating in Pennsylvania (sponsor summary) was amended and reported from the Senate Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform: Senate Bill 8 (Folmer-R-Lebanon) further providing for civil asset forfeiture reform was amended and reported from the Senate Appropriations Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Safe Harbor In Human Trafficking: Senate Bill 554 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) immunize the child victims of human trafficking from criminal prosecution (sponsor summary) was reported from the Senate Appropriations Committee and is on the Senate Calendar for action.

Police Body Cameras: Senate Bill 560 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) authorizing the use of body cameras for police officers (sponsor summary) was reported from the Senate Appropriations Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Sanctuary Campuses: Senate Bill 273 (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) withholding state funding from institutions of higher education adopting sanctuary campuses policy (sponsor summary) was reported from the Senate Education Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Epinephrine Auto-Injectors: House Bill 224 (Simmons-D-Philadelphia) authorizing school bus drivers and school crossing guards to use epinephrine auto-injectors (House Fiscal Note and summary) was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Driver Drug/Alcohol Testing: Senate Bill 553 (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) further providing for testing of drivers for drugs or alcohol was Tabled.

Legislative Hearings

April 24– Senate Judiciary Committee holds hearing to examine DNA testing and post-conviction relief.  Hearing Room 1, North Office Building. 10:00.

April 25–  Senate Bill 461 (Killion-R-Delaware) further providing for the use of DNA testing (sponsor summary), Senate Bill 496 (Scavello-R-Monroe) providing additional sentencing options for gambling disorders (sponsor summary), Senate Bill 510 (Reschenthaler-R- Allegheny) increasing penalties for threatening law enforcement officers (sponsor summary). Room 8E-B East Wing.  11:30.

May 8–  House State Government Committee hearing on House Bill 466 (Marshall-R- Beaver) authorizing sheriffs and deputy sheriffs to enforce the same laws as municipal police officers (sponsor summary). Room G-50 Irvis Building. 10:00.

(Source:  Crisci Associates PA Capitol Digest)

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Maryland Statehood, April 28, 1788

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Louisiana Statehood, April 30, 1812

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Superior Court candidates to appear at Chancellor’s Forum on April 18

The Philadelphia Bar Association and Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts will host candidates for the Superior Court of Pennsylvania at a Decision 2017 Chancellor’s Forum on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from 4 – 5:30 p.m. in the Association’s 11th Floor Conference Center, located in the Aramark Tower at 1101 Market St.

Applicants sought for Supreme Court Committees

COMMITTEE, BOARD OR ADVISORY GROUP DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
 

Appellate Procedural Rules Committee

 

 

April 30

 

more information

Civil Procedural Rules Committee

 

April 30 more information
Minor Judiciary Education Board

 

April 30 more information
(this position is for an MDJ member)
Minor Judiciary Education Board

 

April 30 more information
(this position is for a lay elector)
Continuing Legal Education Board April 30 more information

 

The information below is from Crisci Associates PA Capitol Digest

Session schedule

Senate

April 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

House

April 17 (non-voting), 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, & 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, & 30

Public hearings

April 17– House Aging & Older Adult Services, Health and Human Services Committees hold a joint hearing on proposal to combine the departments of Aging, Health, Human Services and Drug and Alcohol Programs.  Room 140 Main Capitol.  1:00.

April 19– House Health Committee meets to consider House Bill 353 (Nesbit-R-Butler) providing for the electronic prescribing of opioid medications instead of handwritten prescriptions (sponsor summary).  Room G-50 Irvis Building. 9:30.

April 19– House Judiciary Committee meets to consider House Bill 168 (Saccone-R- Allegheny) Stolen Valor Act (sponsor summary), House Bill 671 (M.Keller-R- Cumberland) state preemption over local firearms and ammunition regulations (sponsor summary).  Room 140. 10:00.

April 19– Senate Education Committee meets to consider Senate Bill 273 (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) withholding state funding from institutions of higher education adopting sanctuary campuses policy (sponsor summary).  Room 461 Main Capitol. 9:30.

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Benjamin Franklin died April 17, 1790

 

The Attorney General  has yet to announce specific policy changes, but Steven H. Cook’s place in the inner circle speaks volumes about where the Justice Department is headed.

Read the full report from the Washington Post

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Risk assessment and proposed revision to Sentencing Guidelines

The Commission on Sentencing published notice in the April 8 PA Bulletin of proposed revisions to the sentencing guidelines and a risk assessment instrument for public comment. (PA Bulletin, Page 1999).  Five public hearings are scheduled in May to gather comments.  Comments are due May 19.

Session Schedule

The House and Senate are not meeting this week.

Senate

April 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

House

April 18, 19, 24, 25, & 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, & 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, & 30

Bills Moving

House

Child Assaults & Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition: House Bill 594 (Benninghoff-R- Mifflin) prohibit persons charged with rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse or assault against a child from being placed into Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition (sponsor summary) was reported out of the House Appropriations Committee and was passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Sex Offenders: House Bill 631 (Marsico-R- Dauphin) further providing for probation for sex offenders was reported out of the House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Mandatory Minimum Sentences: House Bill 741 (Stephens-R-Montgomery) further providing mandatory minimum sentences for certain firearms and drug violations violations was removed from the Table, amended on the House Floor, was referred into and out of the House Appropriations Committee and was passed by the House by a vote of 122 to 67.  A House Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.  (Last session similar legislation was not taken up by the Senate.)

Reporting Convictions: House Bill 548 (Readshaw-D-Allegheny) requiring DOS Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs to report convictions within 30 days was referred into and out of the House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Metals Theft: House Bill 267 (Metcalfe-R-Butler) relating to the theft of secondary metals (sponsor summary) reported from the House Judiciary Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Indecent Exposure: House Bill 489 (Quigley-R- Montgomery) further providing penalties for indecent exposure (sponsor summary) was reported from the House Judiciary Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Child Sexual Assaults Civil Actions: Senate Bill 261 (Scarnati-R- Jefferson) further providing for civil actions regarding childhood sexual assault was amended and reported from the House Judiciary Committee and is on the House Calendar for action.

Child Endangerment: House Bill 217 (Kauffman-R-Franklin) further providing for the differentiating cases of placing a child at risk (sponsor summary) was reported from the House Judiciary Committee and is on the House Calendar for action.

Public hearings in Philadelphia and Reading areas

April 12– House Democratic Policy Committee hearing on pretrial and bail procedure reform.  South West Leadership Academy, 7101 Paschall Ave., Philadelphia. 2:00.

April 13– Joint Hearing By Senate Appropriations, Aging & Youth, Health & Human Services and Intergovernmental Operations on Gov. Wolf’s proposal to consolidate the departments of Health, Human Services, Aging and Drug & Alcohol Programs.  Reading Hospital, Conference Center, R Building, Ground Floor, 420 South 5th Ave., West Reading. 11:00.

April 13– House Democratic Policy Committee hearing on intersection of early education and criminal justice.  Saint Joseph’s University Center, Cardinal John P. Foley Campus Center, 390 North Latches Lane, Merion Station, Montgomery County. 10:00

(The information above is from Crisci Associates PA Capitol Digest)

Supreme Court amends Juvenile rules changing title of “Master” to “Juvenile Court Hearing Officer.”

Click for Order

Click for Rules

Click for Rules

April 30 is deadline to apply for Appellate Court Rules Committee

Click for information

Distracted driving citations continue to rise in Pennsylvania

Click for news release from Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts

April 12, 1861–The American Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina.

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Florida State Attorney Aramis Ayala was elected last year on a vow to end tough-on-crime rhetoric and advance criminal justice reform. But just two months into her term, Ayala faces attempts to run her out of office after she refused to seek the death penalty for a man accused of killing a police officer.

Ayala, whose district in Central Florida includes Orange and Osceola counties, announced last month that she would not seek the death penalty in the seven capital murder cases being handled by her office, including the prosecution of 41-year-old Markeith Loyd, who is charged with killing his pregnant girlfriend and an Orlando police officer.

The decision was praised by advocates for criminal justice reform, but it outraged local law enforcement groups and state GOP lawmakers, underscoring the potential political ramifications facing a new crop of reform-minded prosecutors across the country.

Gov. Rick Scott removed Ayala from Loyd’s case, a decision upheld Tuesday by a Florida judge after Ayala fought it in court. Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran has called on Scott to suspend the prosecutor, while the head of the state police union wants her removed from office altogether.

And in a budget proposal released last week, state lawmakers are seeking to slash more than $1.4 million and 21 positions from Ayala’s office, a move that her spokeswoman, Eryka Washington, has decried as “political posturing” that would cripple its ability to prosecute cases.

 

Ayala didn’t take a position on the death penalty during her campaign, but after researching the issue, she said she concluded that officers are no safer in states where prosecutors pursue the death penalty. And the often-lengthy appeals process in such cases means vows to quickly dispense of lethal justice are “a false promise” to victims’ families, she said.

“The death penalty doesn’t improve public safety. It doesn’t serve as a deterrent,” Ayala said in an interview. “I had to make that determination — am I going to give victims this false promise?”

More than 100 prosecutors, judges and law professors defended Ayala — the state’s first elected black prosecutor — in an open letter that decried Scott’s decision to remove her from Loyd’s case as an infringement on prosecutorial independence.

“Not all of us agree with her decision. But we do agree that she has the authority and discretion to make it,” the letter stated.

Ayala is among several prosecutors elected in recent years on the promise to usher in various changes to curb what they consider an over-incarceration crisis. Prosecutors in New York and Seattle have lessened the frequency with which they prosecute cases of marijuana possession, and in Houston, the prosecutor has begun a diversion program in which those caught with small amounts of marijuana are issued a citation and take an online course instead of being carted to jail. In Chicago, the local prosecutor has stopped treating shoplifting cases of less than $1,000 as felonies. And, as in Orlando, the local prosecutor in Denver has announced that she will not seek the death penalty while in office.

“For the first time, we have a critical mass of local elected prosecutors who believe that we need to do things differently and who are looking for ways to change the culture and practices in their offices,” said former federal prosecutor Miriam Aroni Krinsky, now executive director of the Fair and Just Prosecution, a criminal justice reform group. “And that’s going to mean making the tough calls in the tough cases.”

But those tough calls come with political repercussions. In Orlando, Ayala immediately faced opposition not only from law enforcement groups, but also from her fellow Florida prosecutors, some of whom believe that refusing to seek death for the worst criminals could lead to an increase in attacks on officers. The powerful Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association coordinated a rebuke of Ayala, signed by 19 of her 20 fellow state’s attorneys.

“The victims’ families of Florida deserve our dedication to implement all the laws of Florida,” the prosecutors’ statement declared. “That is why the people of Florida have elected us.”

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi decried Ayala’s decision as a “blatant neglect of duty.” A county official was forced to resign after he wrote a Facebook post that seemed to call for Ayala to be lynched. Ayala “should be tarred and feathered . . . ” Stan McCullars, assistant finance director for the Seminole County clerk of court, wrote in a now-deleted post, “ . . . if not hung from a tree.”

Loyd had been dating Sade Dixon, 24, for about three months when, on Dec. 13, he allegedly shot and killed her and wounded one of her brothers outside the Dixon family home in Orlando. Dixon was two months pregnant with Loyd’s child.

A nearly month-long manhunt for Loyd ended when a woman recognized him shopping at a Walmart and alerted Sgt. Debra Clayton, a 17-year veteran of the Orlando police department, according to police records. Police say Loyd ran behind a pillar when he saw Clayton approaching him outside the store and fired three shots at her. Struck in the hip, Clayton fell as Loyd approached her, continuing to fire. After the fatal shot pierced Clayton’s neck, Loyd “casually” drove away, according to a police account of surveillance footage. He was found nine days later in an abandoned home.

Loyd’s arrest came amid a years-long debate over the legality of Florida’s death penalty statute. The state, which has more than 400 people on death row, has not been able to execute anyone since January of last year, after the U.S. Supreme Court said that the state’s statute was too broad. A new statute was signed into law earlier this year.

While some victims’ families want prosecutors to seek death, others dread the years of court proceedings that such a case is guaranteed to bring.

“You have to understand that we want closure,” Stephanie Dixon, Sade’s mother, told reporters in a news conference in support of Ayala. “And with closure doesn’t mean to be dragged in and out of court with appeals and everything else.”

State Capitol Complex

SESSION SCHEDULE

Senate 

April 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

House

April 3, 4, 5 , 18, 19, 24, 25, & 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, & 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, & 30

BILLS MOVING

Senate

Federal REAL ID: Senate Bill 133 (Ward-R-Westmoreland) fix for federal REAL ID issues was reported from the Senate Appropriations Committee and was passed by the Senate.  A Senate Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the House for action.

Feds & Medical Marijuana:  Senate Resolution 36 (Folmer-R-Lebanon) urging Congress to renew the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment to prevent the U.S. Department of Justice from spending funds to interfere with the implementation of state medical marijuana laws (sponsor summary) was adopted by the Senate.  No further legislative action is needed.

Anatomical Gifts: Senate Bill 108 (Sabatina-D-Philadelphia) prohibit discrimination against disabled people in need of organ transplants (sponsor summary) was reported from the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Animal Abuse Task Force: Senate Resolution 35 (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) directing the Joint State Government Commission to establish an Animal Abuse Prevention Task Force (sponsor summary) was reported from the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Testing Of Drivers: Senate Bill 553 (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) further providing for testing of drivers for drugs or alcohol was reported from the Senate Transportation Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Epinephrine Injectors: House Bill 224 (Simmons-D-Philadelphia) authorizing school bus drivers and school crossing guards to use epinephrine auto-injectors (House Fiscal Note and summary) was reported from the Senate Education Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Police Body Cameras: Senate Bill 560 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) authorizing the use of body cameras for police officers (sponsor summary) was amended and reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee and referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Safe Harbor In Human Trafficking: Senate Bill 554 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) immunize the child victims of human trafficking from criminal prosecution (sponsor summary) was amended and reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee and referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

PUBLIC HEARINGS

April 4– NEW. House Judiciary Committee meets to consider House Bill 90 (Zimmerman-R-Lancaster) expanding the Ethnic Intimidation law to include police and other first responders (sponsor summary), House Bill 267 (Metcalfe-R-Butler) relating to the theft of secondary metals (sponsor summary), House Bill 489 (Quigley-R-Montgomery) further providing penalties for indecent exposure (sponsor summary), Senate Bill 261 (Scarnati-R- Jefferson) further providing for civil actions regarding childhood sexual assault (Senate Fiscal Note and summary).  Room 140 Main Capitol.  10:00.

April 5– Joint Hearing of House Aging & Older Adult Services, Health and Human Services Committees on Gov. Wolf’s proposal to merge the departments of Aging, Drug & Alcohol Programs, Health and Human Services.  Room 140 Main Capitol. 9:00.

April 17– House Aging & Older Adult Services, Health and Human Services Committees hold a joint hearing on proposal to combine the departments of Aging, Health, Human Services and Drug and Alcohol Programs.  Room 140 Main Capitol.  1:00.

(The information above is from Crisci Associates PA Capitol Digest)

EVENTS

April 3—Appellate Courts Committee.  Newest members of Superior Court (Judges Moulton, Ransom, and Solano), noon, Philadelphia Bar Association, 1101 Market Street.

April 4—Chancellor’s Forum, candidates for District Attorney, 4 to 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 4, 2017 from 4 – 5:30 p.m.,The Great Hall at Moore College of Art located at 20th Street and the Parkway.

April 5—Criminal Justice Section Executive Committee, 12:30 p.m., 11th Floor, 1101 Market Street.

April 18—Chancellor’s Forum, candidates for Superior Court, 4 to 5:30 p.m., Philadelphia Bar Association Conference Center, 11th Floor, 1101 Market Street.

NEWS

PA Supreme Court approves language access plan for courts.   Click for news release

House Bill 741 (restoring mandatory sentences voted out of House Judiciary Committee.  Click for bill history and text.

Prosecutors back bill to restore mandatory minimum sentences.  Click for report from Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

COMMENTARY

Eugene Volokh:  Court overturns probation condition limiting use of devices that contain ‘any encryption … software.’    Click for column in Washington Post

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Martin Luther King died April 4, 1968

 

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Senate Judiciary Committee to hold hearing on Senate Bill 400 concerning review of police use of deadly force

On March 27 the Senate Judiciary Committee  will hold a hearing on Senate Bill 400 (Haywood-D- Philadelphia-Montgomery).  See  sponsor summary.   The bill would take review and prosecution of deadly force incident at the hand of police officers out of the jurisdiction of the local district attorney and put it in the hands of a special prosecutor.
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The bill would require the Attorney General to appoint a special prosecutor whenever there is a deadly force incident and a police officer is involved. The special prosecutor would serve as an impartial prosecutor and remove the perceived conflict a district attorney might have prosecuting a local police officer.

The hearing will be at 10 a.m. in Room 8E-B East Wing Capitol Building.

Senator Art Haywood

May 5 is deadline to comment to proposed changes to rules on bench warrants, detention of witnesses, bench warrants for persons under age of 18, and detention of material witnesses under age 18

Click for text of changes and report

May 5 is deadline to comment on proposed new rule on truancy expungement

Click for text of proposed rule and report

The information below is from Crisci Associates PA Capitol Digest

Session Schedule

Senate

March 27, 28, 29

April 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

House

April 3, 4, 5 , 18, 19, 24, 25, & 26

May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, & 24

June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, & 30

Bills Moving

House

Law Enforcement Officers: House Bill 27 (White-R- Philadelphia) further providing for the release of law enforcement information in the event of a officers involved in a shooting was reported out of the House Appropriations Committee and passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Bail Forfeiture: House Bill 280 (Delozier-R- Cumberland) further providing for forfeiture and allocation of bail monies was reported out of the House Appropriations Committee and was passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Crime Restitution: House Bill 285 (Stephens-R-Montgomery) requiring criminals to pay restitution to crime victims was reported out of the House Appropriations Committee and was passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Epinephrine Auto-Injectors: House Bill 126 (Baker-R-Tioga) further authorizing the use of epinephrine auto-injectors was removed from the Table, was referred into and out of the House Appropriations Committee and was passed by the House.  A House Fiscal Note and summary is available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for action.

Child Assaults & Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition: House Bill 594 (Benninghoff-R- Mifflin) prohibit persons charged with rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse or assault against a child from being placed into Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition (sponsor summary) was reported from the House Judiciary Committee and was referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Sex Offenders: House Bill 631 (Marsico-R- Dauphin) further providing for probation for sex offenders (sponsor summary) was reported from the House Judiciary Committee and was referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Gun Safety Devices: House Bill 718 (F.Keller-R-Snyder) excluding lockable gun safety devices from Sales Tax (sponsor summary) was reported from the House Finance Committee and was referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Condominium Dispute Resolution: House Bill 595 (R.Brown-R-Monroe) further providing for alternative dispute resolution related to condominiums (sponsor summary) was reported out of the House Urban Affairs Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Reporting Convictions: House Bill 548 (Readshaw-D-Allegheny) requiring DOS Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs to report convictions within 30 days (sponsor summary)           was reported from the House Professional Licensure Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action.

Mandatory Minimums: House Bill 741 (Stephens-R-Montgomery) further providing mandatory minimum sentences for certain firearms violations was reported from the House Judiciary Committee and Tabled.

Pediatric Cancer Tax Check-Off: House Bill 46 (Caltagirone-D- Berks) providing for a Pediatric Cancer Research State Income Tax Check-Off (sponsor summary) was amended and reported from the House Finance Committee and Tabled.

Investigational Drugs: House Bill 45 (Godshall-R-Montgomery) providing for the use of investigational drugs, biological products and devices by terminally ill patients “Right To Try” legislation was amended and reported out of the House Human Services Committee and Tabled.

Senate

Federal REAL ID Compliance: Senate Bill 133 (Ward-R-Westmoreland) fix for federal REAL ID issues (sponsor summary) was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.  (The Committee has scheduled a meeting for March 27 to consider the bill.)

Animal Abuse: Senate Bill 176 (Reschenthaler-R-Allegheny) child and animal abuse cross reporting (sponsor summary) was Tabled.

Children Of Incarcerated Parents: Senate Bill 62 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) further providing for adopt and grounds for involuntary termination related to children of incarcerated parents (sponsor summary) was Tabled.

PA Stolen Valor Act: Senate Bill 42 (Williams-D-Philadelphia) establishing the PA Stolen Valor Act (sponsor summary) was Tabled.

Combine Corrections/Probation & Parole:  Senate Bill 522 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) consolidation of the Department of Corrections and Probation and Parole (sponsor summary) was reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Additional Common Pleas Judges:  Senate Bill 222 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) providing for additional Common Pleas Court judges was amended and reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.  The bill includes new Judges for Bucks, Delaware and Montgomery Counties.

Animal Abuse: Senate Bill 298 (Alloway-R-Franklin) enacting the Libre’s animal abuse law (sponsor summary) was reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

Feds & Medical Marijuana:  Senate Resolution 36 (Folmer-R-Lebanon) urging Congress to renew the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment to prevent the U.S. Department of Justice from spending funds to interfere with the implementation of state medical marijuana laws (sponsor summary) was amended and reported out of the Senate State Government Committee and is now on the Senate Calendar for action.

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March 28, 1979–Nuclear accident at Three Mile Island

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