A blog of the Philadelphia Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section

FILE - This is an undated file photo of the electric chair at the Tennessee State prison in Nashville. First used by New York State in 1890, it was used throughout the 20th century to execute hundreds and is still an option in eight states. Since 1976, 158 inmates have been executed by electrocution. It was considered humane on its introduction but resulted in many horrific executions over the years. (AP Photo, File)

An undated file photo of the electric chair at the Tennessee State Prison in Nashville. (AP Photo, File)

By Lindsey Bever, Washington Post, May 23, 2014

Tennessee can now use the electric chair in the event that its prisons are unable to obtain lethal injection drugs — a recent problem in some states that employ the death penalty.

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam signed a bill into law Thursday allowing the state to electrocute death row inmates as a backup to lethal injection, still the main method of execution in the United States. The move makes Tennessee the first state to enact a law to reintroduce electrocution without giving prisoners a say, the Associated Press reported.

Click for the entire story in the Washington Post

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